Victims’ bill of rights are laws put in place to protect the victim’s rights to justice and due process

Victims’ bill of rights are laws put in place to protect the victim’s rights to justice and due process. Each state has established a form of protection for its victims and some states even created constitutional amendments to protect these rights. North Carolina, New York, Maryland and Colorado are a few states that established a victim’s bill of rights.
In the state of North Carolina, victims are given the right to be notified of any court proceeding and appeals. Victims in North Carolina also get the right to be heard and may even be entitle to restitution. North Carolina is currently trying to establish Marsy’s Law which would give victims more rights.
In the state of New York, like North Carolina victims can file for restitutions, be notified of all court proceedings, and the right be heard. While North Carolina’s and New York’s victim bill of rights have some similarities, New York rights add more protection to the victim. New York allows victims to get a copy of the police report, they are notified of the status of their offender (notice of discharge, released or escape) and protection against an employer (victims cannot be penalized by employers while appearing in court proceedings).

In the state of Maryland, like all state you are given the right to be heard and notified/attend all court proceedings. But in the state of Maryland the police and District court have to inform victim of their basic rights and given a pamphlet explaining their rights and services.
Like the previous listed states, the state of Colorado allows all victims to be heard and to be notified of all court proceedings. But Colorado victims’ bill of rights covers not only the victim but also the victims’ designee (such as a parent/guardian, or immediate family member) in case the victim is deceased.

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