There is a fine line between savagery and civilization when it comes to survival

There is a fine line between savagery and civilization when it comes to survival. The novel, Lord of the Flies, by William Golding is a chronicle of civilization giving way to the savagery within human nature, as the boys are shaped by the supremely civilized British society become savages guided only by fear, superstition and desire. Golding develops his theme by showing conflict between two main characters, Jack and Ralph, who respectively represent civilization and savagery. This has an effect on the rest of the boys throughout the novel as they delve further and further into savagery. The theme of savagery versus civilization is first introduced by the author through the symbol of the conch shell, which is associated with Ralph as he is the first person to use it. The author explains, “They were quieted slowly, and at last were seated again. Ralph dropped down and spoke in his ordinary voice” (Golding 5). This quote demonstrates how Ralph wants to maintain order within his tribe by creating certain rules. In addition, Golding shows Ralph’s desire for civilization by stating, “I’ll give the conch to the next person to speak.” This suggests that Ralph is the flagbearer of civilization as he is giving everybody a chance to speak by holding the conch. Ralph has created as a democratic place which shows a civilized side to them as they try to mimic the homes they have just left.