Psychology is around me and it is around you

Psychology is around me and it is around you. It is everywhere. The broad nature of this subject makes it possible for it to be applied to any aspect in society. It has many approaches and perspectives and this is what fascinates me the most about it. How do we develop? Does our upbringing as children affect our future personality? Nature or nurture? How do we learn new languages and how does this affect our brain? Why do we dream? These are some of the questions I have been wondering about these past few years since I started to slowly get to know what psychology is and what it actually entails.
My passion and interest for a career in Psychology began in year 11 when I decided make a speech for the GCSE English Speaking exam about the theories of Sigmund Freud – the founder of psychoanalysis and one of the most influential and controversial people in this field. At that time I had very little understanding and insight about the subject however his theories on the psyche, the psychosexual development of children and the unconscious brain awoke my fascination on the subject. Despite the fact that a lot of his ideas were completely wrong, there is no denying that he wasn’t a huge contribution to his field. This is how science moves forward – by the contribution of people and by disproving theories, not the opposite. Doing this speech has helped me improve my oral communicatory and presentational skills. These skills are essential and would help me both while studying this course and pursuing a future career within the field.
The great opportunity to volunteer in Bowerham Primary and Nursery School in Lancaster allowed me to gain skills and experiences I think make me the perfect candidate for this course. While observing children’s behaviour and development I wondered how much of this links to their psyche. I look forward to finding out how children develop physically, socially and mentally while doing this course.
While volunteering there I also learned how to engage and effectively communicate with children, and volunteering and dealing with kids has made me more aware of confidentiality and ethics as children are one of the most vulnerable people. I believe that my caring and patient nature will help me in my degree and my future aspirations as a psychologist. Other volunteering experiences such as helping out within my school and local community also have helped me to improve my organisation and time management skills which again I think will be essential for this course.
My scientific, analytical and practical skills also make me an ideal candidate for this subject. Doing Chemistry at A Level has allowed me to develop these very important skills that will help me in the research based side of Psychology. I have proven these skills by being selected from my school to participate in a RSC Schools Analyst Competition at Lancaster University. This experience challenged my problem solving skills, which are essential to strengthen my competence in Psychology. I look forward for similar challenges this degree has to offer! Similarly doing Biology at A level has taught me to interpret data and look for correlations in results and also doing Sociology at A level has taught me various types of research methods and sampling. Chemistry and Biology are predictable subjects as the behaviour of chemicals have a set pattern however Sociology has taught me that when dealing with people, behaviours are much more unpredictable. This is why I also look forward to studying Psychology as I would love to learn how to do research and measurements on these unpredictable behaviours outside the lab environment which I am used to.
I also had the amazing opportunity to be one of the 3000 students in the HE+ collaborative project between the University of Cambridge and Cardinal Newman College. Attending classes on social sciences in which Psychology was one of them, peaked my interest even more about the subject.
Something personal and unique to me is that I am trilingual – a great asset to the cognitive process according to psychological studies. According to a study from Spain’s University of Pompeu Fabra multilingual people are more perceptive and better observing of their surroundings and are better at focusing on relevant information. Other psychological researchers also suggest that multi-linguals tend to make more rational choices, that they are better at problem solving and that they not only have improved cognitive skills but also social abilities. I cannot be fully certain of the mental benefits that multilingualism provides me with however I would love to learn more on how our brain starts to operate differently when learning a new language.
François Grosjean discusses whether multilingual people change their personality when changing their language and whether it is the environment that causes these changes in feelings and behaviours. This is also a very intriguing topic as I myself believe I experience this change in personality. However again I would love to learn more on the psychology behind language and see for myself if there is any relationship between the two.
One of my biggest passions except psychology is my huge interest in foreign cultures and music, especially Asian. I believe that being multilingual has allowed me to have a more open mind and appreciate cultures much different from mine. Studying this course may allow me to have a deeper understanding of the different identities of people from different cultures around the world.
In conclusion even though I did not have the opportunity to study Psychology at A level, my interest for this course is proven by my strong passion and eagerness to get a deeper understanding on human development and human cognition where I would love to explore topics such as language, music and dreams. I look forward to the challenges this degree has to offer and only with this determination and passion to be successful I will be making an important contribution to society.