Abigail’s father Weyland abandoned the family when Abigail was four years old

Abigail’s father Weyland abandoned the family when Abigail was four years old. This affected her in a negative way as she adored and looked up to her father which is portrayed through ” she thought of her father as a king.” Abigail feels as though her family values have been overlooked and no longer have a meaning due to her father’s actions. We later discover that Katherine and Weyland Kirk met after their divorce, in secret talking about whether or not to reunite the family. “I might as well tell you. I had dinner with your father last night.” Abigail felt betrayed by her mother’s actions, and was disappointed that her mother would even think of returning to Weyland after all he has done to her. However, we see through this the power which the transformation of love brings, and that times gives one an opportunity to dwell upon their mistakes and right their wrongs. After Abigail is transported to the eighteenth century, she takes notice of the way the Bow family treat each other, and realises that she was being selfish and thoughtless when speaking to her mother earlier, furthermore it was her attitude which was causing the family to fall apart even more than it already had. “The first thing was their kindness. How amazingly widespread it was They had taken responsibility for her, nursed and clothed her. Someone had given up her bed, probably Beatie; no one had complained when she was snappish and rude about Dovey’s best clothes, about the lack of sanitation; no one had condemned her unsympathetic attitude towards Gibbie. “I’m not kind,” said Abigail with a sickish surprise. “Look how I went on with Mum when she said she wanted us to get together with Dad again. Furthermore, Abigail uses the qualities she learns to forgive her mother and father.